Art in Science.com

beautiful data visualizations and recordings

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Brain Art Competition

what? – yes that is real and organized by “The Neuro Bureau” since 2010. The submission deadline is May 28th, just in case you have some stuff to submit. If not, have a look on some beautiful realizations from the past years:

Thin slice through the structural connectome
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credit: Joachim Böttger, Ralph Schurade Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany

MEG source connectivity analysis using 3D graph visualization
b861fa4c95e87c31e105bb61b4a246b677bade2ef019d651932be39df491e18814ea36d88635de08aa7f4bda5ac936ccf5fe6428c74d4583c01cb297a5e23426 Brain Art Competition
credit: Sebastien Dery Montreal Neurological Institute

Cerebral Infiltration
11 Brain Art Competition
credit: Sherbrooke Connectivity Imaging Lab (SCIL): Maxime Chamberland, David Fortin, Maxime Descoteaux

Much more on the “The Neuro Bureau” website!

NASA earth photo of the year

The people vote the picture below as NASA’s photo of the year: “The play of light on water can reveal overlooked details and nuances to photographers and artists on Earth. The same thing can happen when looking from space.” Truly beautiful but maybe not my first pick…click here for a huge achive full of impressive pictures!

canaryislands tmo 2013166 lrg NASA earth photo of the year
Canary Island (image credit: NASA)

klyuchevskaya oli 2014104 lrg NASA earth photo of the year
Klyuchevskaya volcano in Russia (image credit: NASA)

Corals and sponges in HD

Incredible recordings from Daniel Stoupin: “Slow marine animals show their secret life under high magnification. Corals and sponges are very mobile creatures, but their motion is only detectable at different time scales compared to ours and requires time lapses to be seen. These animals build coral reefs and play crucial roles in the biosphere, yet we know almost nothing about their daily lives.”

Credits and more information: Daniel Stoupin